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20120801
20120831
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
on planet earth who was watching. let's take a look at that moment in jpl when they got their confirmation. >> touchdown confirmed. we are safe on mars. >> [cheering] >> we are wheels down on mars. >> by the time they relayed the information curiosity had been on mars for seven minutes. look at the mix of triumph, relief and then unbridled joy as curiosity sent back the first images of the surface. thumbnails as they call them from each corner of the rover showing how sits and how it fares. it is the best possible outcome sharing this experience which is one reason why they came to watch at nasa aimes tonight. >> in a sometimes cynical, sometimes idealistic world it took an attempted landing on a different one, mars, to bring all of these people back to the aimes research center. >> this is eight and a half months of waiting at the end of a long mission. >> there are not too many mars landings in my lifetime, so i am glad to see one. >> it took the curiosity rover from space to the surface of mars. from an entry feet of 13 kilometers per second to 0 in ser harrowing minutes. a one-ton rove
of terror. >> thank you. anyone who hasn't seen the video, google it. it is put out by jpl in pasadena. we have this robot hurdling through space at 13,000 miles per hour. it weighs one ton. it is the size of a mini cooper. the pathfinder was a microwave. this is big. headed through space. the atmosphere of mars is very thin. it is not as soft and gentle an entry as it would be here on earth. within seven minutes, it needs to go from 13,000 miles per hour to zero and land gently and this elegant sequence of events need to happen perfectly to land successfully. it involves parachutes and rockets. pretty marvelous feat of engineering. a lot has been invested. i talked to scott harber today. he used to be the lead researcher. he said the mood is of confidence, but tension. a blanket of tension over the confidence. we tested all these tools as much as we can. it is time to get on up there and give it a try. it is really high stakes. >> will this actually scoop things up and get it back to us or it will collect data? >> it will collect data and transmit back to us. how we will find out if it is
:00 p.m. the event includes presentations and then from 10:00 to midnight, live broadcast from jpl laboratory. we'll have live coverage of the journey tomorrow at 6:00 and 11:00 expm get more information on her web site. under "see it on tv". >> alan: we have some rain out there? >> leigh: sprinkles. more or less a mist and drizzle. especially near the coast, and i want to show you the cumulus buildup, along the highest peaks. this is from the mt. tamalpais camera. you can see a little break 0 in the action, little heating taking place but it's then the subtropical moisture, live doppler 7hd picking that up nicely, and we have reports of a few showers. we're going to take you up north bay between santa rosa, towards pet human -- petaluma, a brief shower here, moving off towards the north and west. right here near shilo road, we have this -- this is a false return but what is not a false return i right here, this is moving to the north and east around napa. you'll see a little wet pavement. if this cell holds together -- they've been moving quickly from south to north and been falli
who was watching. let's take a look at that moment in jpl when they got their confirmation. >> touchdown confirmed. we are safe on mars. >> [cheering] >> we are wheels down on mars. >> by the time they relayed the information curiosity had been on mars for seven minutes. look at the mix of triumph, relief and then unbridled joy as curiosity sent back the first images of the surface. thumbnails as they call them from each corner of the rover showing how sits and how it fares. it is the best possible outcome sharing this experience which is one reason why they came to watch at nasa aimes tonight. >> in a sometimes cynical, sometimes idealistic world it took an attempted landing on a different one, mars, to bring all of these people back to the aimes research center. >> this is eight and a half months of waiting at the end of a long mission. >> there are not too many mars landings in my lifetime, so i am glad to see one. >> it took the curiosity rover from space to the surface of mars. from an entry feet of 13 kilometers per second to 0 in ser harrowing minutes. a one-ton rove
malin. don sumner from the university of california in davis. andy mischkin from jpl. doug ellison at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins predicts good morning. but another fantastic day on mars. curiosity continues to behave basically it flawlessly three had executed all of the planned activity successfully and nominally yesterday. it is a good time to point out the team operating curiosity also is performing basically flawlessly and completing of planned activities as well. it really is a great day all around. a couple of things for these activities, we are about to do or upgrade our software on the rover, just like we upgrade our operating system on your home computer or laptop, we're going to do the same thing. the software though it is optimized for service. landing does not have to drive the rover and operate the arm. the service does not have to land the vehicle. we will switch to the new flight software that is optimized for surface operations. we will do that starting the day after tomorrow. sol 5. prep work for that activity. we will check out the backup flight comput
. john blackstone is at jpl in pasadena, california. john, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, jeff. i think we can safely say this morning that the jet propulsion lab is the happiest place on earth. because the "curiosity" over, the car-sized rover, this is just a model, the real thing is safely on the surface of mars. it's such a complex landing that some observers gave the chances of success at no better than 50/50. nobody had ever done anything like this before. and it was all happening 154 million miles away. >> we're just under six minutes to entry. >> in mission control, the tension was obvious as the spacecraft approached mars to begin what was called seven minutes of terror. but with each successful stage of the entry, confidence grew. >> parachute deploy. [ applause ] >> nothing was certain, however, until "curiosity" was confirmed to have landed safely on martian soil. >> touchdown confirmed we are safe on mars. [ cheering ] >> as the celebration began, mission control seemed to lose control. many involved had been working on this mars rover for a decade. >> lift-off. >>
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)